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K-State Agronomy eUpdates

Department of Agronomy

Kansas State University

2004 Throckmorton PSC

Manhatan, KS 66506

785-532-6101

agronomy@ksu.edu

Extension Agronomy

K-State advanced experimental wheat lines set for possible release in 2016

In the 2016 K-State Winter Wheat Performance Tests, and at some wheat field days and tours the next two months, producers will be able to see three advanced experimental lines from K-State. The following information describes these experimental lines and their proposed names if they are approved for release in the summer of 2016. Seed increase of all these lines has been good and they will be ready for release if approved by the K-State variety selection committee, according to Daryl Strouts, CEO of Kansas Wheat Alliance.

KS060143K-2 (proposed name: “Larry”)

At some field day and tour locations, signs for this line may read “KS060143K-2” while at other locations the signs may read “Larry,” the proposed name for this line if it is released. For now, it’s best to refer to it as KS060143K-2. The name “Larry” honors Larry Patton who was a long-time technician in the corn and wheat breeding programs at K-State.

Figure 1. K-State experimental line KS060143-2 (proposed name “Larry” if officially released). Photo by Bryson Haverkamp, Kansas Wheat Alliance.

 

The pedigree of KS060143K-2 is: Overley sib//Karl 92 *2/Kakatsi/3/KS89180B-2-1-1/CMSW89Y267//X921012-A-27-1. The pedigree contains a CIMMYT spring wheat (Kakatsi) and a facultative CIMMYT wheat derived from a spring x winter cross (CMSW89Y267).

It is expected to be well-adapted statewide. KS060143K-2 has medium-early maturity. It has performed very well across the entire state in each of the past four years. The stability of performance of KS060143K-2 over that period, which includes tremendous environmental diversity, would seem to support the supposition that it is broadly adapted.

It has been the top yielding line in the AYN2 in 2013 and the KIN in 2014. It did suffer damage in the November 2014 freeze which affected its performance in northwest Kansas in 2015. It has exceled under moderate to fairly intense drought. It is a little taller than some of the recent wheats from the K-State Manhattan breeding program, and has a high tiller capacity. KS060143K-2 is moderately resistant to stripe rust but susceptible to leaf rust and will benefit from a fungicide treatment under leaf rust pressure. It has good acid soil tolerance, is resistant to soil borne mosaic virus and has an intermediate to moderately susceptible reaction to FHB. The quality of KS060143K-2 is acceptable. Like Art, Endurance, and SY Wolf, it does carry the 1B.1R wheat-rye translocation.

 

KS12H56-6-4 (proposed name: “Tatanka”)

At some field day and tour locations, signs for this line may read “KS12H56-6-4” while at other locations the signs may read “Tatanka” the proposed name for this line if it is released. For now, it’s best to refer to it as KS12H56-6-4. Tatanka is the Lakota Sioux word for “buffalo or “buffalo bull.”

 

Figure 2. K-State experimental line KS12H56-6-4 (proposed name “Tatanka” if officially released). Photo by Bryson Haverkamp, Kansas Wheat Alliance.

 

KS12H56-6-4 is a hard red winter wheat with medium maturity and medium height. It is derived from a two-way cross, KS07HW81/T151, which was made in fall of 2006. KS07HW81 is a white breeding line developed by the KSU Agricultural Research Center-Hays wheat breeding program and T151 is a hard red winter wheat variety developed by Trio Research Inc. (now Limagrain Cereal Seeds).

KS12H56-6-4 has been tested statewide in the 2014 and 2015 KIN trials. It has competitive yields in both western and central Kansas. In both 2014 and 2015, the mean grain yield of KS12H56-6-4 across the dryland locations in western Kansas was in the top yielding group. In the 2014 western KIN trials, it had higher grain yield than all the red check varieties except Byrd. However, there was no significant difference between KS12H56-6-4 and Byrd in all the dryland trials. In the 2015 western KIN trials, KS12H56-6-4 was the top yielding red line. It had higher yield than all the check varieties.

In the irrigated trial at Colby, it also yielded very well in the last two years and averaged 106 bu/acre. In the central Kansas dryland trials in the last two years, KS12H56-6-4 had higher yield than all the check varieties except one in 2015. 

KS12H56-6-4 has moderate resistance to stripe rust and soil borne mosaic virus. It is intermediate to wheat streak mosaic virus in the field. It has tolerance to acid soil. It also has some resistance to scab. It is susceptible to leaf rust and Hessian fly.

The milling and baking quality of KS12H56-6-4 is good.

The straw strength for KS12H56-6-4 is about average. It is not expected to be used for irrigated production.

 

KS060106M-11 (proposed name: “Zenda”)

At some field day and tour locations, signs for this line may read “KS060106M-11” while at other locations the signs may read “Zenda,” the proposed name for this line if it is released. For now, it’s best to refer to it as KS060106M-11. Zenda is a town in Kingman County.

 

Figure 3. K-State experimental line KS060106M-11 (proposed name “Zenda” if officially released). Photo by Bryson Haverkamp, Kansas Wheat Alliance.

 

The pedigree of KS060106M-11 is: Overley sib/W04-417//Everest. It is expected to be best adapted to central Kansas.

KS060106M-11 is a medium to medium-early maturing hard red winter wheat. It has established a strong yield record statewide but is probably best suited to central and eastern Kansas. It is an early wheat that is taller than Everest. It is similar to Everest for Fusarium head blight reaction and is viewed as an Everest replacement.

The stability of performance of KS060106M-11 over the past four years, which includes tremendous environmental diversity, would indicate that it is broadly adapted. KS060106M-11 is moderately resistant to stripe rust but moderately susceptible to leaf rust and could benefit from a fungicide treatment under leaf rust pressure. It is tolerant to acid soils and resistant to soil borne mosaic virus. The quality of KS060106M-11 is acceptable, performing somewhat better than Everest in K-State bake tests.

 

Steve Watson, Agronomy eUpdate Editor
swatson@ksu.edu