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K-State Agronomy eUpdates

Department of Agronomy

Kansas State University

2004 Throckmorton PSC

Manhatan, KS 66506

785-532-6101

agronomy@ksu.edu

Extension Agronomy

Weather outlook for summer row crops

Summer row crops progress is proceeding at different rates based on the planting date and early-season growing environment (temperature, moisture) this spring. Corn is getting close to flowering in many areas and is already past the flowering stage in some areas, primarily in the southeast part of the state.

Weather-wise, warm temperatures are expected to return next week. The NOAA Climate Prediction Center’s 7-10 day outlook calls for an increased chance of above-normal temperatures statewide, while precipitation is expected to be near normal in the west and above normal in the east.

Figure 1. 7-10 temperature outlook (upper panel); 7-10 day precipitation outlook (lower panel). Source: NOAA Climate Prediction Center.

 

At this time of the year, normal highs are around 90 degrees F, with normal lows in the mid-60s. For Manhattan, the highs are expected to be near 90 degrees F, with the lows in the mid-60s. By Monday, highs in the Garden City area are expected to be in the mid 90’s. Rain is favored in the eastern parts of the state through the weekend, with the quantitative precipitation outlook calling for as much as 2.50 inches in parts of east central and southeast Kansas.

Figure 2. Quantitative Precipitation Forecast. Source: NOAA.

 

For corn, nutrient (K > N > P) and water (0.30 inch per day) demands for the crop are close to maximum when approaching to the VT (tassel) stage. Heat and drought in the coming days and week will affect the potential number of kernels.

 

Soybeans and sorghum are still progressing, but early-season conditions have generally led to very slow growth. These crops will catch up as soon as the heat returns in the coming weeks. Maximum water and nutrient demand will occur later in the growing season for these crops.

 

For the coming week, precipitation and temperatures will critically impact potential corn yield projected for this growing season.

 

 

Mary Knapp, Weather Data Library
mknapp@ksu.edu

Ignacio Ciampitti, Cropping Systems and Crop Production Specialist
ciampitti@ksu.edu