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K-State Agronomy eUpdates

Department of Agronomy

Kansas State University

2004 Throckmorton PSC

Manhatan, KS 66506

785-532-6101

agronomy@ksu.edu

Extension Agronomy

Insurance implications for late-planted corn

The final planting date for corn from the USDA Risk Management Agency Topeka Regional Office in the majority of Kansas is May 25th (see map below). After the final planting date there is a “late planting period” that extends for 20 days after the final plant date.

The map can be viewed at: https://www.rma.usda.gov/fields/ks_rso/2017/final/kscorn.pdf

For corn acres that haven’t been planted by the final planting date growers have several options:

  1. Plant the insured crop during the late planting period, and insurance coverage will be provided. The late planting period for corn in Kansas and Nebraska is 20 days after the final planting date. The production guarantee is reduced 1% per day for each day that planting is delayed after the final planting date.
  2. Plant the insured crop after the late planting period has ended if you have been prevented from planting during the late planting period, and insurance coverage will be provided. The insurance guarantee will be 55% of the original production guarantee.
  3. Acreage that was prevented from being planted due to an insured cause of loss can be left idle and receive a full prevented planting payment, also equal to 55% of the original production guarantee.
  4. Plant a cover crop during or after the end of the late planting period and receive a full prevented planting payment as long as it is not hayed or grazed before November 1. The cover crop cannot be harvested for grain or seed at any time.
  5. Plant another crop (second crop) after the late planting period (if also prevented from planting through the late planting period), and receive a prevented planting payment equal to 35% of the prevented planting guarantee.

For example, consider a grower with a dryland corn APH yield of 105 bushels per acre who has signed up for Revenue Protection coverage with a 75% coverage level. Using the spring projected price of $3.96/bushel, this grower would have a production guarantee of 78.8 bushels per acre and a revenue guarantee per acre of $311.85 (= 105 bu/acre x 75% x $3.96/bu). An acre of corn planted five days after the final planting date, for example, would have its production guarantee reduced 5% (1% for each late day), meaning the revenue guarantee would decline 5% from $311.85 to $296.26.

 

Monte Vandeveer, Southwest Area Economist, Garden City
montev@ksu.edu

Lucas Haag, Northwest Area Crops and Soils Specialist, Colby
lhaag@ksu.edu