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K-State Agronomy eUpdates

Department of Agronomy

Kansas State University

1712 Claflin Rd.

2004 Throckmorton PSC

Manhatan, KS 66506

785-532-6101

agronomy@ksu.edu

Extension Agronomy

September weather summary for Kansas: Early autumn

On average, temperatures in September for Kansas were very close to normal. The Southwestern Division had the greatest departure with an average of 69.7 degrees F, or 1.0 degree warmer than normal. The North Central and Northeastern divisions vied for coolest. All divisions had temperatures above 90 degrees during the month. The warmest reading was 104 degrees, reported at multiple locations. On the cool side of the scale, there were 93 new daily record low maximum temperatures and 99 new daily record low minimum temperatures for the month.

The statewide average precipitation for September was 3.04 inches. The total is 116 percent of the normal precipitation for the month. Only the South Central Division averaged below normal, with 1.82 inches, or 70 percent of normal. It should be noted that this does not include the rain that fell during the afternoon and evening of September 30. September saw heavy rains both to start and end the month, with more isolated events during the middle of the month.

 

Drought conditions persist, but there was continued improvement over much of the state. Conditions deteriorated in the south central part of the state. At the start of September only two percent of the state was considered drought-free. At the end of September, the portion of the state that was drought-free increased to almost 19 percent. The El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is still expected to switch to an El Niño event before winter, but it still remains to be seen what impact will be felt.  Other global circulation patterns, including the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), can have significant impacts on the winter season. The October temperature outlook is neutral for the entire state, with equal chances of above normal, normal or below normal temperatures across most of Kansas. The precipitation outlook is also neutral for all except extreme eastern Kansas. In those areas, there is a slight chance for above normal precipitation. This does not indicate how that moisture might be distributed, and means heavy rains or extended dry periods are both possible.

 

 

Table 1

September 2014

Kansas Climate Division Summary

 

Precipitation (inches)

Temperature (oF)

 

Sept. 2014

Jan. - Sept. 2014

 

 

Monthly Extremes

Division

Total

Dep. 1

% Normal

Total

Dep. 1

% Normal

Ave

Dep. 1

Max

Min

Northwest

1.57

0.05

109

15.56

-2.85

84

65.5

0.3

101

30

West Central

1.84

0.24

111

17.76

-0.13

97

67.2

0.8

102

30

Southwest

1.83

0.21

115

15.28

-1.78

88

69.6

1.0

104

35

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

North Central

3.17

0.54

115

20.64

-3.28

85

66.7

-1.2

101

32

Central

4.67

2.16

187

22.73

-2.26

91

68.4

-0.7

102

31

South Central

1.82

-0.78

70

21.51

-4.56

82

70.6

0.4

99

35

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Northeast

3.98

0.37

110

23.88

-5.39

81

66.0

-1.4

97

34

East Central

4.23

0.57

114

22.08

-9.18

70

67.5

-0.8

99

34

Southeast

4.94

0.93

122

23.63

-9.79

70

69.6

0.0

97

33

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STATE

3.07

0.45

116

20.23

-4.39

82

67.9

-0.2

104

30

 

                 

 

1. Departure from 1981-2010 normal value

 

 

Mary Knapp, Weather Data Library
mknapp@ksu.edu