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K-State Agronomy eUpdates

Department of Agronomy

Kansas State University

1712 Claflin Rd.

2004 Throckmorton PSC

Manhatan, KS 66506

785-532-6101

agronomy@ksu.edu

Extension Agronomy

Wheat conditions in north central Kansas

In north central Kansas, wheat has been helped somewhat by the rainfall in June. Overall, the yield potential of wheat in this area is as good as or better than in most other regions of the state. However, wheat planted late or doublecropped after soybeans in this area is generally thinner and has less yield potential than full-season wheat.

Some wheat leaf diseases and problems were found in Clay and Republic counties this week; primarily tan spot, physiological leaf spotting, and Cephalosporium stripe. Of those problems, tan spot is the most widespread and the most likely to affect yield potential on several fields.

 

Figure 1. Tan spot in Clay County. Photo by Jim Shroyer, K-State Research and Extension.

 

 

Figure 2. Physiological leaf spotting on the flag leaf of wheat in Clay County. This problem, which is not a true disease, was isolated to just a few scattered plants. Photo by Jim Shroyer, K-State Research and Extension.

Figure 3. Cephalosporium stripe on wheat in Clay County. This is a soil-borne fungal disease and cannot be controlled with fungicides. Varietal resistance and crop rotation are the most effective means of control. It is most commonly found in the Pacific Northwest. Photo by Jim Shroyer, K-State Research and Extension.

 

Jim Shroyer, Crop Production Specialist
jshroyer@ksu.edu

Erick DeWolf, Extension Plant Pathology
dewolf1@ksu.edu